City Personnel Blog

Elevator Pitch: What Is It & How To Use It

Say you meet a LinkedIn connection at a networking event, or run into a fellow intern from your college internship. They ask you what you have been up to lately, and what your company does. Where do you start?You meet a LinkedIn connection at a networking event or run into a fellow intern from your college internship, and they ask you what you have been up to in your new position and what your company does exactly. Where do you start?
August 17, 2017

Say you meet a LinkedIn connection at a networking event, or run into a fellow intern from your college internship. They ask you what you have been up to lately, and what your company does. Where do you start? You definitely don't want to stand around babbling about the least important aspects of your newest gig. Enter the elevator pitch. An elevator pitch is a brief 30-second sales pitch on what you do and what your organization does. It should be concise, memorable, and to the point. Making yours as clever as possible is a great way to be remembered. It is one of those tools we all need to have in our back pocket.

When To Use An Elevator Pitch:

This technique goes well beyond a salesperson pitching their new product or service. Professionals and entrepreneurs can use it when introducing their firm to a new or potential client, to sell a new idea to the CEO, or to mingle at a networking event.

Creating A Memorable Pitch:

It takes a little practice to find the right way to present your pitch. It needs to sound compelling and flow naturally in a conversation. Here are a few steps we came up with to create your own signature pitch...

  • Identify your goal

          What is the objective of your pitch? Make sure they leave knowing who you are, and what differentiates you from your competitors.

  • Explain what you do

          Describe what you do, or what your organization does. Focus on the problems you solve and how you help people to solve them. Avoid specific numbers since they can bore your audience. Cover key initiatives and tout the recent progress you've made.

  • Engage with a question

          Ask open-ended questions. Questions with “yes” or “no” answers don't engage people in conversation. Make sure you're prepared for any follow-up question they may have, now matter how tricky.

  • Pull it all together

          practice your pitch once you're satisfied with its main points. Read your speech aloud and time yourself. An ideal pitch doesn't last longer than 30 seconds, the approximate time of an elevator ride with a potential client or employer (hence the moniker "Elevator Pitch").